Learning Portfolio Three Q2

The term ‘chunking’ refers to the breaking up of long strings of information in to chunks making the information easier to commit to memory. It works by breaking up the information into smaller portions as it has been proven that long stings or chain of information are harder to memorise. It can be used for most mediums such as text, sounds and video (Harrod, 2002). In Martin Harrod’s article he states that the simplest example of this is phone numbers. For example:

0432423014 is harder to read than if it was broken up: 04 3242 3014

Chunking is ideal when specific and important information needs to be memorised but it is long winded. The breaks allows the brain to, rather than memorise a long string with no breaks, to see the information in a simpler manner therefore making it easier to memorise. The information is still the same, however the brain interprets  it in a different way, it stimulates the brain’s memory centre and shorter segments are inherently easier to memorise. While chunking makes memorising chains of information easier it should be used with cation if the information needs to be analysed or searched within a search engine it can make the task harder and more time consuming that searching for it in it entirety.

References

Harrod, M (2002).  Interaction Foundation of Design chapter 43; Chunking. Retrieved from:  https://www.interaction-design.org/literature/book/the-glossary-of-human-computer-interaction/chunking

Meyer, K. (2016). How Chunking Helps Content Processing. Retrieved from: https://www.nngroup.com/articles/chunking/

*please note the phone number used in the example is not an active number

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